It seems to me that pronouncements from evolutionists always provide more questions than answers. Here’s just one more of those pronouncements…

A_smiling_baby

According to a BBC news report* the regular use of caesarian sections in birth is affecting human evolution:

“Women with a very narrow pelvis would not have survived birth 100 years ago. They do now and pass on their genes encoding for a narrow pelvis to their daughters.”

“Historically, these genes would not have been passed from mother to child as both would have died in labour”.

I can’t help wondering, after one million, or one-and-a-half million, or two million years of human evolution, or how ever long current thinking says it’s been going on, and at the outset of which only a couple or a few proto-humans started us all off, why we haven’t already bred out all those nasty narrow-pelvis genes. Wouldn’t all related women and children and so their inferior genes have died off by now? How did any survive at the beginning?

I know I’m no expert at all, but I’ve had the impression for decades that more and more doctors and surgeons are preferring caesarian birth as a simpler and safer option for their patient. Surely this could account for the six-in-a-thousand increase in caesarian births since the 1960s, and not human evolution taking a turn for the worse?

The expert quoted in this report lets slip one of the hardest matters for evolutionists and secularists to deal with. He said that the death of such women and their offspring:

“…is, from an evolutionary perspective, selection.”

I don’t think he meant to say so, but the natural inference of this view when considered with the mechanics of evolution is that if your wife and your baby die because of a narrow birth canal it’s okay: evolution is doing its work.

Being one of those not willing to blindly accept the conceit known as human evolution I can’t help asking some questions. From the perspective of natural selection and the survival of the fittest, are we actually attempting to oppose nature by having hospitals, doctors and fitness clubs? Shouldn’t we just let it all happen…death, disease and suffering? Are we tinkering with the ultimate goal of mud-to-god transformation by having police forces, prisons, governments, armies, laws and education establishments? Or are wars, hospitals, police forces and caesarian births actually an integral part of that evolutionary process-a product of it?

Gosh, that’s a tough nut to crack for the philosophers and politicians determined to shape our society. And make no mistake, they do think about and discuss those very questions. The Margaret Sangers  and the Adolph Hitlers of the world are infamous examples of people who’ve taken evolution seriously, but they’ve only been visible because they’ve taken gigantic, consequential steps to act upon their ideologies. How many more were and are acting unseen?

Atheists and evolutionists claim that we theists and Christians sweep under the carpet all the difficult issues they see in our beliefs. But they’re really no better off. At least Adolph Hitler was man enough (if totally insane and megalomaniacal) to state as plainly as day his view that nature needs a “helping hand” to wipe out those who are weakening the human gene pool.

The consequences of evolution, when confronted honestly, are far more serious than those that any unbeliever can cook up to stick on the believer. Yes, it does seem like an impossible task, on the face of it, to reconcile suffering and faith in a loving God. Search my series on suffering. But in evolution struggle and death are creative and necessary: in the creationist, theistic worldview struggle and death are destructive and bad.

Biblical answers make much more sense to me, and much kinder sense, than the hard, cold realities of the hypothesis known as “evolution”. Evolution is perpetual change, ostensibly for the better, but which in reality brings struggle and suffering, followed by annihilation, to every living thing. The Christian, on the other hand, knows that suffering and death are unnatural and temporal, and that everyone is offered an eternity of health, perfection and completion in Jesus Christ.

* http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38210837

 

 

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