Category: MUSIC

I’ll confess I’m not an authority on churchy affairs, but perhaps that’s a good thing. Perhaps it’s time political correctness within the church faced a little more opposition from those who aren’t under its power…


I’ve no doubt that many or most church ministers are working hard and doing their best for their congregations and for their God. But my experience and my observation of today’s church world, overall, is that the flock is not being prepared for what it already faces, or for what may be coming…

We don’t have to go any further than our television or our web-based news feeds to see the direction our world is heading in. Here in the US we’re becoming more and more polarized as the haters crawl out of the closet and make their intentions clear. Our culture is being torn because those who are most intent on changing it have the power of most of the media on their side.


Of those who take a Biblical view of culture and politics in the Church how many are talking about it? Alright, we don’t have to side openly with either major political party, but we absolutely should be discussing the issues, because they affect all of us and all our children. We don’t live in a theocracy or a church state, and I wouldn’t want to. But we all, in a so-called “democracy” or “republic” or “democratic republic” have a right and a duty to shape it, rather than just handing it over to those who want to tear down all the principles our Creator created us to live by, and even the obvious principles of nature itself.




Another but not unrelated subject is sex and romance. Without these none of us would be here, right? But how many churches and their ministers discuss the hows and the whys of love: the principles God expects us to live by? How many discuss that stuff which the Bible calls “sin”? “Sin” is such a little word, but it’s so profoundly important. How many young people are being told what sin is and what its consequences are? How many are being told that the things now being forced onto the Western world regarding morality and sexuality are enough to bring eternal consequences?

…those who do such things will not inherit the kingdom of God (Galatians 5:19-21 NIV).


Some in the Church regard the subject of our origins as being insignificant. Where we came from isn’t important, they say. What did Jesus say about origins? He said:

If you believed Moses, you would believe me…but if you do not believe his writings, how will you believe my words? (John 5:46).

The writing of Moses, and the prophets, and the apostles, all speak of our creation: not our evolution. We’re made by God in the image of God, not by chance, random mutations and billions of years of time in the image of a lemur or an ape-like creature. Calling into question our creation is calling into question our salvation from sin, and our eternal destiny. If all the writers are wrong about creation, so are they wrong about salvation.


Our kids are being taught that they evolved from soup. The church which is not working to correct this view is not, I repeat not, caring for its flock.


I believe in the rapture of the Church. However, what many ministers in churches and on the radio and internet are teaching is that before all that’s foretold in Revelation and elsewhere occurs we’re all going to be taken to heaven…



Why did our God go to so much trouble to foretell last days events if we aren’t going to see them or experience them? Why do so many prophecy “experts” make a living at what they do if all the time we’re going to disappear before it all happens? Why are so many in the Church sticking their heads in the sands of rapture, when half way across the world many of their believing brothers and sisters are already being martyred for their faith? We are not all going to escape what is to come. We are not all going to get out of here, without some very serious opposition first. So why are the churches passing out buckets full of sand when they should be equipping the saints for what may come and for what has already come in many parts of the world?


One powerful way to prepare the Church for what it has to deal with and for what it may have to face is through fellowship and worship. Sadly, I see very little. I see cliques and little groups who like each other and turn their noses up at the rest. I see very few Bible studies where the  Bible is studied and where it’s not just another opportunity for someone to give a sermon rather than openly discuss Scripture in relation to today’s world. And I see a kind of worship where if you don’t like or accept a very specific genre of music, i.e. Christian “contemporary” music-an innocuous and generic form of pop-you’re out of luck and probably out of any possibility of fellowship.


We all get bombarded with lies from every direction. And who did Jesus say was the father of all lies? The devil.

Our history is being revised and scrubbed out by our education establishments and our media. Our “news” feeds are not giving us news at all any more but propaganda, gossip, slander and fakery. Our schools and universities are teaching that we all evolved out of nothing, that there’s no truth to Christian “myths”, and that the Christian Church is the cause of all that’s wrong in the world. Our entertainment world is stuffing gross immorality and extreme violence down our throats, sometimes dressed in special effects, and always with attractive people, to get our attention. Our politicians are (generally) out of touch with reality, with their own voters, and with any sense of Godly wisdom, and our judges are making laws and ignoring others to suit their own agendas.

So how is the Church countering all the lies and deceit we all face every day? I’ll rephrase that last question. Is the Church countering all the lies and deceit?






Did you ever try to return to a place you once loved, thinking it would still be as you left it? It’s not always a good idea. The Bible warns against looking back when we should be pressing on ahead for the prize. The temptation comes to all of us at some time, and on such an occasion I wrote a few lines as a warning to myself not to try it again…



The place I’ve missed

Does not exist Nick

It’s on no list

It’s not a statistic

(Copyright © Nick Fisher)

I once wrote a post titled “What should Church Music Sound Like?” The natural sequel to such a discussion, to my mind, has to be concerned with what worship should look like…


This may seem like an odd question to some, but it’s pretty straightforward really. When we all sit or stand in our churches those of us blessed with eye-sight are unavoidably looking at something or someone. And the trend in latter times towards what is termed “contemporary worship” has been towards watching a performance up there on the stage: how cute the girls and guys are, what they’re wearing and how they have their hair; how impressive the guitar licks and drum rhythms are; how cool the light show is; how expensive the sound system is.

There are times when the worshipers are not heard-not necessarily because the band is too loud but because the congregation isn’t singing-they’re too busy watching the performance. In a really bad scenario you will get a dirty look from those around you if you do sing loudly.

Well excuse me, but I can’t help being one of the few voices to raise an alarm here. Who are we supposed to be worshiping: Jesus Christ, or the band? I’m not against the principle of guitars and drums etcetera. What I’m against is the idea that we-the congregation-have to be entertained and impressed. I know for a fact that some people go to church because the music has a “great beat”, or because the vocalist is “cute”. Eventually that “cute” guy leaves his wife and goes off with one of his admirers.

I’m sorry, but that just makes me gag. And on a more spiritual note, it makes me sad and frustrated because the entire point of church is being missed. It’s not about entertainment, it’s about loosing our life to become Christ-like, and so to gain it. It’s about giving all our worship to our Creator: the almighty, omnipotent God and His Son, who alone deserves it all and requires it all.

Alright, I can’t expect churches to do it my way, but let me give a little example of what I personally think church music should look like. For me the most moving and uplifting moments of corporate worship have been when the musicians-at floor level-were obscured by the believers all around me (and I say this as a musician myself-I don’t want to be noticed if I’m playing in church). There was no visual focus, and no sensual stimulation: it was just me, God, and my brothers and sisters in Christ, lifting up our voices far above the music, singing a song written by someone who had been moved to write from his or her own experience with, and view of God. The music was good, yes, and part of the worship, but it was the accompaniment to our worship-not the reason for our presence.


As millions of you readers out there (yes I am joking) may have already noticed, music features highly in my list of favorite things, and yes, I am rather obsessed…



This may be the most self-indulgent selection for my “ten greatest” yet. For that I apologize (I think). But the subject matter is undeniable: listening to music does amazing things to my mind, body and soul. When the world seems all wrong I can wash myself, yes, with prayer, but then with some top-notch sounds…and put it right again within minutes.

Of course, I’m not the only one so affected. Music is a language gift from our Creator, ultimately for our worship of him but also for our enjoyment, even if it’s not overtly “worship” music.

(Unknown Title, by Anon-make sure you can hear the bass)

The other day I revisited the above tune which I recorded from the radio  in ’02 or ‘03 from John Peel’s show in the UK. I regret that I took no note of who authored it or what the title was, but within three seconds of its commencement a flood of emotion washed over me-a self-conditioned Pavlovian response perhaps-but more likely a divinely designed response. As is so often the case, it wasn’t just the melody, the minor chord progression, the understatement or the rhythms of the piece which appealed to my predominantly melancholy nature, but the sheer genius imagination of its author. It’s the inventive power of the composer and ultimately the giver of the gift of music, which touches my heart and soul.

Unfortunately, the world is now awash with what Orwell called ‘musaac”, and while beauty in all things is in the eye (and ear) of the beholder so that I don’t want to trash someone else’s tastes, it seems you can’t go anywhere or do anything without being subjected to somebody’s idea of “great music” and noises designed to facilitate the parting of you and your money. Music is everywhere we go now, like air which may be fresh and sweet or polluted and rancid. Consequently there have been times in recent years I’ve thought I could go off the whole concept of music altogether, for the same reason as I might go off chocolate if I was forced to eat it all day long. So I take great steps to keep my mind free of what I don’t want to hear as far as I can, so that what I do enjoy is not thrown out like the proverbial baby with the bathwater.


I have extremely varied tastes in music, which include certain Classical, Electronic and Jazz styles, with still a delicious hangover from the guitar bands of the past that I’ve loved. I can find as much pleasure in a Chopin nocturne as I can in the Ramones, or in electronica such as I’ve added to the post.

My Mum told me that when I was three years old I would commandeer the family record player (an ancient music reproduction device-but yes, still the best sound quality out) and select my favorites, playing them over and over. So began a love affair which I’m convinced was God-given: a blessing to mankind every bit as great as flowers, scenery and sunsets. I often thank the Lord for allowing me not only to enjoy music, but also for helping me to discover some of the most amazing sounds ever made in the physical universe.

I wrote a post some time ago called “Music As a Love Language of God”. I expressed myself as clearly as I can in that post, so if you’re interested, here it is:




Here’s a track from an album I produced about ten years ago called “Talking Universe”. The album was largely inspired by the fact that nature is witness to its Creator… 


“Consider the Ravens” music and recording © by Nick Fisher

“Wheat Field With Crows” by Vincent Van Gogh, 1890

Photograph “Carrion Crow In Flight” by Jonathan Walker

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