Cascades In Winter

I realize I’m not the first to notice this, but it seems to me that atheists,  agnostics, skeptics, and hyper-tolerant people who cannot tolerate the millions who worship Jesus Christ, are once again shooting themselves in the foot when they insist on using the term “happy holidays” rather than the traditional “Merry Christmas”.

I don’t at all mind saying “happy holidays” or related non-Christian terms to those who I know are offended by the gospel of Christ-they have a right to reject the free gift of eternal life if they so choose, but I’m certainly not going to be intimidated into not saying the name of “Christ” in public, just in case someone who claims to be tolerant but isn’t hears me.

The word “holiday” actually originates from an old English word meaning “holy day”! Having disposed of that nasty “C” name for the winter celebration (and what are we celebrating without Christ?) people are still content to observe some “holy days”. Perhaps they’re content to settle for anything without that frightening name in it. And considering our current political climate in the West, I wouldn’t be surprised to hear the word “holiday”, particularly in a land where”holiday” is pronounced “haa-luh-day”,  morph into “Allah day”.

Just joking.

Pagan holidays? So what! I’m not worshiping any pagan deity or principle, I’m celebrating the fact that Jesus Christ came into the world to save sinners, and if I choose to do that with a Christmas tree in my house I’m not going to be filled with demons.

So Merry Christmas everyone, and thank God for Jesus.

Origin of HOLIDAY

Middle English, from Old English hāligdæg, from hālig holy +dæg day

First Known Use: before 12th century

Origin:

Old English hāligdæg ‘holy day’

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/holiday

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